May 26-28 2005 | Vancouver, Canada

Online Proceedings

Click on any of the links below to download a PDF of that paper.

Keynote Speakers

Don Buchla. A History of Buchla's Musical Instruments.

1

Golan Levin. A Personal Chronology of Audiovisual Systems Research.

2

Bill Buxton. Causality and Striking the Right Note.

4

Paper and Report Sessions

Session 1: Concepts, Aesthetics, and Collaboration

John Bowers and Phil Archer. Not Hyper, Not Meta, Not Cyber but Infra-Instruments.

5

Teemu Mäki-Patola, Aki Kanerva, Juha Laitinen and Tapio Takala. Experiments with Virtual Reality Instruments.

11

Gil Weinberg and Scott Driscoll. "iltur" - Connecting Novices and Experts Through Collaborative Improvisation.

17

Sergi Jordà. Multi-user Instruments: Models, Examples and Promises.

23

Tina Blaine. The Convergence of Alternate Controllers and Musical Interfaces in Interactive Entertainment.

27

Session 2: NIME Implementations

Dan Overholt. The Overtone Violin.

34

Juan Pablo Cáceres, Gautham J. Mysore and Jeffrey Treviño. SCUBA: The Self-Contained Unified Bass Augmenter.

38

Elliot Sinyor and Marcelo M. Wanderley. Gyrotyre. A Hand-held Dynamic Computer-Music Controller Based on a Spinning Wheel.

42

Angelo Fraietta. The Smart Controller Workbench.

46

Eric Singer. A Large-Scale Networked Robotic Musical Instrument Installation.

50

Jesse T. Allison and Timothy A. Place. Teabox: A Sensor Data Interface System.

56

Session 3: Pot-Pourri

Sageev Oore. Learning Advanced Skills on New Instruments (or practising scales and arpeggios on your NIME).

60

Dan Livingstone and Eduardo Miranda. Orb3 - Adaptive Interface for Realtime Sound Synthesis & Diffusion within Socially Mediated Spaces.

65

Georg Essl and Sile O'Modhrain. Scrubber: An Interface for Friction-induced Sounds.

70

Peter Swendsen and David Topper. Wireless Dance Control: PAIR and WISEAR.

76

Roger B. Dannenberg, Ben Brown, Garth Zeglin and Ron Lupish. McBlare: A Robotic Bagpipe Player.

80

Session 4: Mapping for NIME

Frederic Bevilacqua, Remy Muller and Norbert Schnell. MnM: a Max/MSP mapping toolbox.

85

Jean-Marc Pelletier. A Graphical Interface for Intuitive Signal Routing.

89

Gary Scavone and Andrey da Silva. Frequency Content of Breath Pressure and Implications for Use in Control.

93

Alain Crevoisier and Pietro Polotti. Tangible Acoustic Interfaces and their Applications for the Design of New Musical Instruments.

97

Ross Bencina. The Metasurface: Applying Natural Neighbour Interpolation to Two-to-Many Mapping.

101

Andrey R. da Silva, Marcelo Wanderley and Gary Scavone. On the Use of Flute Air Jet as A Musical Control Variable.

105

Session 5: Voice, Gestural Control and Multimodality

Xavier Rodet, Jean-Philippe Lambert, Roland Cahen, Thomas Gaudy, Florian Gosselin, Fabrice Guedy and Pascal Mobuchon. Sound and music control using haptic and visual feedback in the PHASE installation.

109

Golan Levin and Zachary Lieberman. Sounds from Shapes: Audiovisual Performance with Hand Silhouette Contours in The Manual Input Sessions.

115

Tomoko Yonezawa, Noriko Suzuki, Kenji Mase and Kiyoshi Kogure. HandySinger: Expressive Singing Voice Morphing using Personified Hand-puppet Interface.

121

Mathias Funk, Kazuhiro Kuwabara and Michael J. Lyons. Sonification of Facial Actions for Musical Expression.

127

Jordi Janer. Voice-controlled plucked bass guitar through two synthesis techniques.

132

Session 6: Learning, Tools + Connectivity

Paul D. Lehrman. Bridging the Gap Between Art and Science Education Through Teaching Electronic Musical Instrument Design.

136

Hans-Christoph Steiner. The [hid] toolkit: a unified framework for instrument design.

140

Teemu Mäki-Patola. User Interface Comparison for Virtual Drums.

144

Arthur Clay, Thomas Frey and Jürg Gutknecht. GoingPublik: Using Realtime Global Score Synthesis.

148

Ole Gregersen, Lars Pellarin, Jakob Olsen, Niels Böttcher, Michel Guglielmi and Stefania Serafin. Connecting strangers at a train station.

152

Greg Schiemer and Mark Havryliv. Pocket Gamelan: a Pure Data interface for java phones.

156

Posters

Posters 1: NIME Implementations

David Birchfield, David Lorig and Kelly Phillips. Sustainable: a dynamic, robotic, sound installation.

160

Paulo Maria Rodrigues, Luís Miguel Girão and Rolf Gehlhaar. CyberSong.

164

Jamie Allen. boomBox.

168

Alex Loscos and Thomas Aussenac. The Wahwactor: A Voice Controlled Wah-Wah Pedal.

172

William B, Carter, Leslie S. Liu. Location33: A Mobile Musical.

176

Laszlo Bardos, Stefan Korinek, Eric Lee and Jan Borchers. Bangarama: Creating Music with Headbanging.

180

Posters 2: Mapping and Software

Alvaro Barbosa, Jorge Cardoso, Gunter Geiger. Network Latency Adaptive Tempo in the Public Sound Objects System.

184

Nicolas Villar, Adam Lindsay, Hans Gellersen. Pin&Play&Perform: A rearrangeable tangible interface for musical composition and performance.

188

D. Birnbaum, R. Fiebrink, J. Malloch, M. Wanderley. Towards a Dimension Space for Musical Artifacts.

192

Ge Wang, Ananya Misra, Ajay Kapur, Perry R. Cook. Yeah, ChucK It! => Dynamic, Controllable Interface Mapping.

196

Adam R. Tindale, Ajay Kapur, George Tzanetakis, Peter Driessen, Andrew Schloss. A Comparison of Sensor Strategies for Capturing Percussive Gestures.

200

Eric Lee and Jan Borchers. The Role of Time in Engineering Computer Music Systems.

204

Posters 3: Interfaces

Shigeru Kobayashi and Masayuki Akamatsu. Spinner: A Simple Approach to Reconfigurable User Interfaces.

208

Thor Magnusson. ixi software: The Interface as Instrument.

212

Eduardo Miranda and Andrew Brouse. Toward Direct Brain-Computer Musical Interfaces.

216

Robyn Taylor, Daniel Torres and Pierre Boulanger. Using Music to Interact with a Virtual Character.

220

Elaine Chew, Alexandre François, Jie Liu and Aaron Yang. ESP: A Driving Interface for Expression Synthesis.

224

Cornelius Poepel. On interface expressivity: A player based study. [errata]

228

Johnny Wingstedt, Mats Liljedahl, Stefan Lindberg and Jan Berg. REMUPP - An Interactive Tool for Investigating Musical Properties and Relations.

232

Demonstrations

Demo Room 1: Composition & Tools

Perry R. Cook. Real-Time Performance Controllers for Synthesized Singing.

236

David Kim-Boyle. Musical Score Generation in Valses and Etudes.

238

Kevin C. Baird. Real-Time Generation of Music Notation via Audience Interaction Using Python and GNU Lilypond.

240

Demo Room 2: Motion and Sound

Jesse Fox and Jennifer Carlile. SoniMime: Movement Sonification for Real-Time Timbre Shaping.

242

Robert Huott. Precise Control on Compound Curves.

244

Damondrick Jack and Robert Lugo. Beat Boxing: Expressive Control for Electronic Music Performance and Musical Applications.

246

Ivan Franco. The Airstick: A Free-Gesture ControllerUsing Infrared Sensing.

248

Jennifer Carlile and Björn Hartmann. OROBORO: A Collaborative Bi-Manual Controller with Interpersonal Haptic Feedback.

250

David Rodriguez and Ivan Rodriguez. VIFE _alpha v.01: Real-time Visual Sound Installation performed by Glove-Gesture.

252

Demo Room 3: Haptics and Music

David Hindman and Spencer Kiser. Sonictroller.

254

William Verplank. Haptic Music Exercises.

256

John Eaton and Bob Moog. Multiple-Touch-Sensitive Keyboard.

258

Angelo Fraietta. Smart Controller / Bell Garden Demo.

260

Mauricio Melo and Doria Fan. Swayway MIDI Chimes.

262

Derek Wang. Bubbaboard and Mommaspeaker: Creating Digital Tonal Sounds from an Acoustic Percussive Instrument.

264

Demo Room 4: Low Noise

Emmanuel Flety. The WiSe Box: a Multi-performer Wireless Sensor Interface using WiFi and OSC.

266

Adam Bowen. Soundstone: A 3-d wireless music controller.

268

Interactive Sound Installations

Installation Session 1

Alain Guisan. Intrium.

270

Eric Socolofsky. Contemplace.

271

Installation Session 2

Maia Marinelli, Jared Lamenzo and Liubo Borissov. Mocean.

272

Seiichiro Matsumura. HotStepJunk.

273

Installation Session 3

Meghan Deutscher, Sidney Fels, Reynald Hoskinson, Sachiyo Takahashi. Echology.

274